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A U.S. Air Force Atlas 5 rocket lifted off Jan. 19 carrying the SBIRS GEO Flight 4 satellite.  Credit: ULA
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Airmen at the Global Strategic Warning and Space Surveillance System Center at Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado, monitor strategic missile warning systems. (Air Force photo)
SBIRS GEO Flight 3 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on Jan. 20 (Lockheed Martin photo)
The U.S. Air Force's  upcoming fifth and sixth satellites in its missile warning constellation will have a new satellite bus, Lockheed Martin's A2100. Credit: Lockheed Martin.
The Air Force's missile warning satellite, SBIRS GEO-3, lifted off aboard a ULA Atlas 5 rocket Jan. 20, after a 24-hour delay. Credit: ULA
SBIRS GEO Flight 3, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Air Force’s Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS), in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin in Sunnyvale, California. Credit: Lockheed Martin
The Air Force's missile warning satellite, SBIRS GEO-3, lifted off aboard a ULA Atlas 5 rocket Jan. 20, after a 24-hour delay. Credit: ULA
The ULA Atlas 5 rocket carrying the Air Force's SBIRS GEO-3 satellite sits on the pad ready for launch, but will have to wait at least another day after  the attempt was scrubbed. Credit: ULA
An Atlas 5 rocket carrying the MUOS-5 satellite lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida June 24, 2016. Credit: ULA/Ben Cooper.
SBIRS GEO Flight 3, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Air Force’s Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS), in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin in Sunnyvale, California. Credit: Lockheed Martin
SBIRS GEO Flight 3, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Air Force’s Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS), in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin in Sunnyvale, California. Credit: Lockheed Martin
The third SBIRS satellite, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Air Force’s Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS), pictured above in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin in Sunnyvale, California. Credit: Lockheed Martin.
The third SBIRS satellite, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Air Force’s Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS), pictured above in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin in Sunnyvale, California. Credit: Lockheed Martin.

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