A Soyuz 2.1a rocket in the lead up to its April 2016 launch from Vostochny — the first and only launch to date from Russia's newly constructed cosmodrome.  Credit: Roscosmos
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un observes the March 7 test launch of four ballistic missiles. Credit: Rodong Sinmun
North Korean intermediate-range mobile missiles on parade in 2015. Credit: North Korean state-run media
Roscosmos chief Igor Komarov said in March that Russia would separate its ISS modules in 2024 to form the basis of a new Russian national space station. The next month, however, he said Russia is open to staying until 2028. Credit: Energia/Tom Kimmel For SpaceNews
Russia is working to complete the Vostochny Cosmodrome in time for an April launch. 
Credit: vostokdrom.ru
Sea Launch's Odyssey platform with launch vehicle. Credit: Sea Launch
Sunrise as viewed from the International Space Station in November. Framing the edge of sun is the Soyuz TMA-17M (front) which brought NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren, JAXA astronaut Kimiya Yui and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko to the station and a Russian Progress 60 (back) cargo craft which arrived back in July. Credit: NASA JSC
Proton EchoStar-21 ILS
Caption: The international space station is seen from Space Shuttle Discovery as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation in 2008.

Credit: NASA photo
Dmitriy Sevastiyanov Gazprom GSS Yamal
International Space Station. Credit: NASA
Progress MS-04
At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 48-49 prime crewmembers Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) pose for pictures May 26 during a final qualification exam session. Rubins, Onishi and Ivanishin will launch June 24 on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a four-month mission on the International Space Station.

NASA/Stephanie Stoll
Expedition 48-49 prime crewmembers Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Kate Rubins of NASA (right) field questions from reporters May 27 at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. Rubins, Onishi and Ivanishin will launch July 7 on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a four-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Stephanie Stoll
Dmitry Rogozin, left, meets with Roscosmos head Igor Komarov and Russian President Vladimir Putin in April 2015. Credit: Kremlin.ru
Caption: The international space station is seen from Space Shuttle Discovery as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation in 2008.

Credit: NASA photo

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