TDRS-M is the third and final spacecraft in a series built by Boeing for NASA. The spacecraft provide S-, Ka- and Ku-band communications services for the International Space Station, Hubble Space Telescope, and other spacecraft in Earth orbit. Credit: NASA
Technical problems could delay the beginning of regular flights by SpaceX's Crew Dragon (left) and Boeing's CST-100 Starliner until at least late 2018. Credit: SpaceX artist's concept and Boeing
TDRS-M is the third and final spacecraft in a series built by Boeing for NASA. The spacecraft provide S-, Ka- and Ku-band communications services for the International Space Station, Hubble Space Telescope, and other spacecraft in Earth orbit. Credit: NASA
An Ariane 5 rocket carrying the Boeing-built Intelsat-33 and SSL-built Intelsat-36 satellites lift off Aug. 24, 2016. Credit: Arianespace
Boeing Phamtom Express XS-1
Global Xpress Inmarsat
Boeing Phamtom Express XS-1
Behnken Starliner
Thaicom 6 Falcon 9 SpaceX
Engineers evaluate the Emergency Egress System as they ride in seats attached to slide wires at Space Launch Complex 41. Credit: NASA/Leif Heimbold
JCSAT-110A (previously known as JCSAT-15) was the first SSL 1300 satellite to use a 3D-printed antenna tower design. Credit: SSL
Trump at Boeing South Carolina
Mark Spiwak, president of Boeing Satellite Systems International. Credit: Kate Patterson for SpaceNews
Inmarsat CEO Rupert Pearce. Credit: Kate Patterson for SpaceNews

Boeing’s LEO constellation hinges on V-band’s viability

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Since filing its license last summer with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission for a constellation of broadband communications satellites, Boeing has focused on developing some of the project’s key technologies, Bruce Chesley, vice president and program manager for Boeing’s Global Broadband Systems, told reporters at a March 7 press briefing.

Business Satellite 2017 BoeingLEO constellationV-band
OW-V OneWeb Constellation

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