U.S. Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson in conversation with SpaceNews at the 34th Space Symposium on April 18, 2018. Credit: SpaceNews
Bridenstine oath of office
Rep. Jim Bridenstine faced criticism on a wide range of issues from Democratic members of the Senate Commerce Committee during a Nov. 1 hearing on his nomination to become NASA administrator. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
U.S. Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.) discussing his American Space Renaissance Act during a keynote address Tuesday at the 32nd Space Symposium. Credit: Tom Kimmell
us_capitol_nasa_1040
U.S.-European collaboration led to the discovery of  the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system. This artist’s impression shows the view from the surface of one of the seven or more planets orbiting the ultracool dwarf star 40 light-years from Earth. Credit: ESO/N. Bartmann/SpaceEngine.org
AFsec4
Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space Policy Stephen Kitay. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Monica King
Gen. John W. “Jay” Raymond, who leads Air Force Space Command, emphasized close coordination with the National Reconnaissance Office during an April 18 press briefing.
U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. Credit: Commerce Department
Jessica Rosenworcel FCC
July 20, 1989: “From the voyages of Columbus, to the Oregon Trail, to the journey to the moon itself, history proves that we have never lost by pressing the limits of our frontiers.”
U.S. President George H. W. Bush, announcing the Space Exploration Initiative. Credit: NASA
Vice President Mike Pence is seen during the National Space Council's first meeting, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
"By leveraging commercial launchers, orbiters, landers, and platforms, NASA will be able to explore and conduct science on the moon far more quickly and cost-effectively than if the agency was planning a more traditional exploration strategy," writes Moon Express CEO Bob Richards. Credit: Moon Express
Bridenstine confirmation hearing
When communications satellites were included in the U.S. Munitions List, the State Department’s list of defense articles subject to extensive International Traffic and Arms Regulations (ITAR), “a lot of foreign parties were not interested in talking to American companies because of the regulatory hurdles they would have to go through,” said Fred Shaheen, Boeing’s chief council for global trade controls. Credit: SpaceNews

Load More arrow