This Week In Space History

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  Space News Business

This Week In Space History

posted: 01 November 2007
04:33 pm ET













Oct. 22



2001:

The Indian Space Research Organisation launches its Technology Experimental Satellite into a sun-synchronous orbit.




Oct. 24



1946:

Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory launches a V-2 rocket from Wallops Island, Va. The rocket took moving pictures of the Earth from altitudes as high as 104.6 kilometers.


1960:

To rush the launch of a Mars probe before the Nov. 7 anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, Field Marshall MitrofanNedelin ignored several safety protocols. As a result




126 people are killed when the R-16 ICBM explodes at the BaikonurCosmodrome in Kazakhstan, during launch preparations, according to RussianSpaceWeb.com.




1998:

NASA’s Deep Space 1 launches from Kennedy Space Center, Fla. on a Delta rocket. It would eventually perform




a




flyby of Comet Borrelly.






Oct. 25



1961:

NASA announces the establishment of a national rocket test site in Hancock County Mississippi. Mississippi Test Operations (renamed John C. Stennis in 1998),




would become the test site for the Apollo program’s Saturn rocket boosters.


1974:

Piloted by Air Force Major Michael Love, the X-24 B becomes the fastest lifting body airframe reaching Mach 1.76 during a test flight from NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif.




Oct. 26



1957:

The U.S.S.R.’s Sputnik 1 ceases transmissions.




Oct. 27



1961:

Saturn 1, the rocket for the initial Apollo missions, launches successfully




for its first test




at Cape Canaveral, Fla.




Oct. 28



1974:

The Soviet Union’s Luna 23 spacecraft launches on a Proton rocket from the BaikonurCosmodrome.




Damage to some of its equipment during the lunar




landing leaves




it




unable to return a lunar soil sample.




Oct. 29



1991:





While on its way to Jupiter, the U.S. Galileo spacecraft flies past




the asteroid Gaspra, obtaining images and other data.