U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, center, ripped into the satellite industry for what he called self-defeating intransigence over sharing of Ka-band spectrum. Credit: FCC
WRC-15 image ITU
Based on the Chinese DFH-4 platform, LaoSat-1 was placed into geostationary transfer orbit by a Chinese Long March 3B rocket operating from China’s Xichang Satellite Launch Center, in Sichuan Province.  Credit: CCTV screen grab
Julie Zoller, the U.S. State Department’s senior deputy coordinator for Communications and Information Policy and deputy head of the U.S. WRC delegation, said just about any piece of the existing Ku- and Ka-band spectrum now in use for satellite services — with the exception of frequencies specifically reserved for national Ku-band broadcast services — could be used for UAV command and control. Credit: ITU
Aireon’s business model is straightforward: It will provide a global surveillance capability with the same performance level as the current ground-based ADS-B system. Air navigation authorities will use the information not only to track aircraft mid-ocean, but also to assign more optimal air routes to save fuel or avoid bad weather. Credit: Aireon
oneweb constellation
Isle of Man filings graphic
WRC-15 spectrum
WRC-15 spectrum
2015 ITU conference meeting
Aireon space-based ADS-B
Credit: SpaceNews/Lance H. Marburger
It is unclear what happened in November to cause at least a half-dozen satellite constellation filings to head to the ITU. Industry officials said it could have been that word leaked that Google and SpaceX were teaming up behind SpaceX’s since-announced several-thousand-satellite constellation. Credit SpaceNews illustration