JWST
The far side of the Moon and distant Earth, imaged by the Chang'e-5 T1 mission service module in  2014 Credit: Chinese Academy of Sciences
Opportunity rover
Mars ascent vehicle
Gen. Mike Holmes, Air Combat Command commander, makes a test call using the High Frequency Global Communication System radio June 15, 2017, on Grand Forks AFB, N.D. Holmes was coined by the 319th Communications Squadron HFGCS unit for making his first official call which broadcasts his voice simultaneously across the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Sparks)
ESA was planning the most ambitious debris removal demonstration: capturing its 8,000-kilogram Envisat environmental-monitoring satellite in 2023 and performing a controlled atmospheric reentry. Now, ESA is exploring synergies between on-orbit servicing and debris removal spacecraft. Credit: ESA
LUVOIR
An illustration of NASA's proposed Deep Space Gateway in orbit around the moon. Credit: NASA
The SOFIA flying observatory
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency wants to develop military space capabilities in low-Earth orbit. Credit: DARPA
NOAA JPSS-1
the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft, carrying a three-man crew, moves in for docking at the International Space Station six hours after launch Friday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA
David Barnhart, a former DARPA project manager, is a research professor in the University of Southern California's Department of Astronautical Engineering. He is also director of USC's Space Engineering Research Center, and director of the Space Systems and Technology Division in USC's Information Sciences Institute. Credit: Space Tech Expo
David Davis, chief systems engineer for the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center in Los Angeles, is exploring the implications the military's focus on resilience will have on satellite building and testing. Credit: Space Tech Expo
GOES-R
This computer-generated view depicts part of Mars at the boundary between darkness and daylight, with an area including Gale Crater beginning to catch morning light. Curiosity was delivered in 2012 to Gale crater, a 155-kilometer-wide crater that contains a record of environmental changes in its sedimentary rock. Credit: NASA JPL-CALTECH

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