SpaceNews.com is reporting from Colorado Springs, Colorado, April 3-6 to bring you comprehensive coverage of the 33rd Space Symposium.

This special coverage is made possible through support from

Behnken Starliner
The Senate Armed Services Committee’s version of the 2016 NDAA, which exempted a total of nine RD-180 engines, prevailed in the compromise bill hashed out by House and Senate conferees. Credit: ULA
Gen. John Hyten, one of the Air Force's top space officers, took leadership of U.S. Strategic Command during a ceremony at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, Nov. 3. Credit: Department of Defense
space weather illustration
Meyerson Blue Moon
Piers Sellers, climate scientist and NASA astronaut, looks out the window of Space Shuttle Discovery during a 2006 mission. He was honored posthumously at the 33rd Space Symposium Wednesday. Credit: NASA
Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos discusses the status of the company's New Shepard suborbital vehicle April 5 at the 33rd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs. Behind Bezos are a model of the New Shepard crew capsule and the propulsion module that flew five suborbital flights. Credit: SpaceNews/Jeff Foust
Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos speaks in front of his company's New Shepard suborbital vehicle on display at the 33rd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs April 5. Bezos said the company still plans to start flying people on suborbital space tourism flights by the end of 2018, although the company has yet to start selling tickets or even setting a ticket price. Development of New Shepard, he said, is informing the company's plans for an orbital launch vehicle, New Glenn, that will use the same BE-4 engines that United Launch Alliance is considering for its Vulcan rocket. Credit: Chuck Bigger for SpaceNews
Landsat 5 was a relatively young eight-year-old spacecraft the last time Congress passed major remote-sensing legislation. Credit: NASA
Peter Guggenbach CEO Ruag Space
“Looking forward for reusability, we don’t believe it really, really counts unless you can turn it around rapidly, or almost as rapidly, as you turn around an aircraft,” SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell said Wednesday at the 33rd Space Symposium. “Our challenge right now is to refly a rocket within 24 hours. That’s when we’ll really feel like we’ve got reusability right.” Credit: Tom Kimmell
Elzbieta Bienkowska, the European Commission’s lead space commissioner, speaking April 5 at the 33rd Space Symposium. Credit: Tom Kimmell
David Melcher, president and CEO of the Aerospace Industries Association, speaking April 4 at the 33rd Space Symposium. Credit: Tom Kimmell
U.S. Air Force Gen. Jay Raymond and Rep. Mike Rogers, the chairman of the House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee at the 33rd Space Symposium breakfast where Rogers was the featured speaker. Credit: Tom Kimmell
Jonathan Arenberg (L), John Mace Grunsfeld (C), and Mary Lynne Dittmar (R), discuss the potential of heavy launch for scientific exploration at the 33rd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs. Credit: Tom Kimmell
Yulong Tian, secretary-general of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), speaking  April 5 at the 33rd Space Symposium. Credit: Tom Kimmell

Load More arrow